Opening Night Reception at the Midwest Center for Photography

Midwest Center for Photography‘s 10th Annual “TEN X TEN Small Works Exhibition”

Opening Night Reception:

  • Friday, November 24, 2017
  • from 7-9pm
  • at the Midwest Center for Photography
  • 1215 Franklin in Wichita, Kansas

 

 

Photographs are on exhibition in the gallery through December 31st, and are also featured for sale online. To order online, please visit: http://www.mwcponline.com/tenth-ten-x-ten.html to purchase direct from the gallery who will package and ship straight to your door.

I’m thrilled to number among the 26 international photographers who have had work selected for the Midwest Center for Photography‘s 10th Annual “TEN X TEN Small Works Exhibition”, which focuses on offering affordable fine art photography works that are ten inches by ten inches in dimension.

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Bear Mountain Suspension Bridge

Recently I got to spend a week in the Hudson River Valley, and while exploring the region I also crossed the Bear Mountain Suspension Bridge, which carries US 6/US 202 across the Hudson River between Rockland/Orange Counties and Westchester/Putnam Counties. At one point in time, specifically in 1924 and part of 1925, it held the record for the longest suspension bridge in the road. The bridge is flanked with a pedestrian walkway as well, so I couldn’t resist the opportunity to park and walk across it. Granted, with storm clouds on the horizon, the more I walked out towards the middle the more I was being plastered against the railing by the force of the wind tunneling between the mountains. I didn’t go all the way across, I figured half way in those nerve-wracking conditions was good enough.

While I tend towards nature photography, I do enjoy some more architecturally flavored photography from time to time, playing with light and shadow, geometrics, positive and negative space, and geometric shapes can be rather entertaining for a photographer.

 

 

 

GAP Winter Wonderland Reception Friday

Join us in Grapevine this Friday, November 17th at 6:30pm for a free reception celebrating the Grapevine Art Project‘s Winter Wonderland Show inside the Lancaster Theater Lobby at the Palace Arts Center located at 300 S. Main Street. Many artists will be in attendance so it’s a great chance to see what your local arts community is up to, and talk to us about our art.

gap_winterwonderland

If you can’t make it to the reception the show is currently open and will run through December 31st, and is available to view Monday through Friday from 9am – 5pm, as well as during other special events at the PAC.

For more information please visit the official website.

 

 

 

Selected into the Midwest Center for Photography Small Works Exhibition

Notifications went out today on who made it into the Midwest Center for Photography‘s 10th Annual “TEN X TEN Small Works Exhibition” and I’m thrilled to say I number among the 26 international photographers who have had work selected for the show. “TEN X TEN” focuses on offering affordable works that are ten inches by ten inches in dimension, and sell for $100 each.

There will be a reception on opening night Friday, November 24th from 7-9pm at 1215 Franklin in Wichita, Kansas. Photographs are on exhibition in the gallery through December 31st, and are also featured for sale online. To order online, please visit: http://www.mwcponline.com/tenth-ten-x-ten.html to purchase direct from the gallery who will package and ship straight to your door.

Here’s the complete list of exhibiting artists:
Antonio Castilho, Lisbon, Portugal; Dave Conkling, Grinnell, IA; Jim Davis, Fairfield, IA; Rachel Deutmeyer, Ames, IA; Jon Dunning, Cambridge, England, UK; Zachary Endter, Vienna, Austria; Jane Feely, Highland Park, IL; Kari Grogan, Concordia, KS; Jim Hammer, Wichita, KS; Douglas Hill, Los Angeles, CA; Charles Hively, Brooklyn, NY; Sophia Howard, Fort Worth, TX; Stephen Howard, Wichita, KS; K. C. Hulsman, Hurst, TX; Barbara Kantz, East Setauket, NY; Fran Lattanzio, Terra Haute, IN; Lauren Lopez, Richardson, TX; Jenna Lynch, Mahopac, NY; Holly McCaslin, Wichita, KS; Dan McCormack, Accord, NY; Lisa Mitchell, Lincs, England, UK; Jennifer Murray, Chicago, IL; Eric Rennie, Cromwell, CT; Linda Robinson, Wichita, KS; Natalie Weber, Glenview, IL; and Michelle Yanga, Howell, MI.

Chris Brandley’s First Snow

A former GCISD art teacher, and fellow member of the Grapevine Art Project Chris Brandley has something a little special to celebrate this holiday season. One of her oil paintings was licensed for use on Christmas snack tins. The tins have some mass distribution as they’re for sale at Big Lots stores around the country! I’ve nabbed some images from the artist’s website so you can see for yourself.

You can read the adventure of not only how the painting came to be, but how her art ended up on these tins by clicking here to visit her blog entry on the subject. So if you go into a Big Lots store and find the tins, I encourage you to send her a selfie with the post to her Facebook page, it’ll make her smile! Of course you can not only take a tin home from a Big Lots, but she has prints for sale of her artwork too.

 

 

 

Owl’right, Owl’right, Owl’right.

I love going to the Hudson River Valley in New York, not only does a very dear friend live there, but the countryside is beautiful and there’s so much natural beauty all around you. Considering the local environs, it’s really no surprise that it’s been an inspiration source for so many artists, and famous even for the Hudson River School, which is credited for being the first coherent American art style, which was very prevalent in the 19th Century and has a legacy that still influences and inspires artists today. The style was known for natural landscapes, and celebrating the environmental wonders and work of the divine found in the world around us as typified by a long list of prominent artists, some of which can be found here.
kch_owl_ny
 
The atmosphere of this image gives the impression of snow, but the white flecks in the background were some sort of fungus growing inside this hollowed out tree.While the mood of the image seems to suggest Winter, I took this shot on a recent autumn trip where it was in the mid 70s outside.
 
I’m not sure, but I believe this is a Barred Owl. If anyone knows for sure, could you please let me know?
 
 

2017 IAA Photography Exhibition – Now Open with Reception this Sunday

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The 2017 IAA Photography Expedition has now opened, and will run through December 1st at the Jaycee Parks Center for the Arts in Irving, Texas. The show is free and open to the public. I feel honored that one of my pieces (Turn Back Time) was selected to participate in this photography competition juried by Mark Thompson. The exhibition contains 75 pieces in total from 44 different regional photographers.

HulsmanKC_02_Time

 

AWARDS CEREMONY & RECEPTION

  • Sunday, November 5th
  • From 2 – 4 pm
  • At the Jaycee Parks Center for the Arts
  • 1975 Puritan Drive in Irving, Texas

IAA_jaycee

I hope you will join all of us during the Reception and Awards Ceremony for the 2017 Irving Art Association’s Photography Exhibition featuring many talented regional photographers, including not only myself but fellow Grapevine Art Project member Klaus Mayer. The preview gallery for all the selected works can be viewed on the IAA’s official website here.

 

 

GAP’s Winter Wonderland Art Show

I’ve got 4 different outlets this month where my photography is on exhibit. One of them now open to the public is at the historic Palace Arts Center in Grapevine where my photograph I took of Beacon Falls in the Hudson River Valley in New York entitled Bridge Over Troubled Waters is on display. It is but one work among many of the other talented works by members from the Grapevine Art Project. The show is free and open to the public.

kchulsman_16x20_photo

GAP WINTER WONDERLAND

The show runs from November 1st – December 31st, at the Palace Arts Center located at 301 S. Main Street in Grapevine, Texas and is available to view Monday through Friday from 9am – 5pm, as well as during other special events at the PAC.

 

 

For more information about the historic Palace Arts Center please visit  here.

palace_arts

 

 

Pushing Daisies – Art Show October 28th

There will be a reception on Saturday, October 28th from 7-11pm for the latest themed show–Pushing Daisies–at the Central Arts of Bedford located at 2816 Central Drive in Bedford. I’ll have several pieces hanging in the show, and of course a range of my prints are also available for perusal.

Admission is free, costumes are encouraged, so please come on by to support your local artists!

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The Fort Davis Area of Texas

Fort Davis is a very small town with a population of 1200 (2010 Census), and has the highest elevation in the entire state for any Texas county-seat at 5,050 feet above sea level. It’s really known for

  1. The National Fort Davis Historic Site, which preserves the best remaining examples of old US ARMY Forts from the Southwestern United States. Fort Davis was established in 1854.
  2. McDonald Observatory, while key scientific discoveries and research occurs at the site, this observatory is one of the few in the world that invites the public to special programs like their Sky Parties.
  3. Davis Mountains State Park
  4. Chihuahuan Desert Nature Center & Botanical Garden

 

While the Dallas / Fort Worth area was skirting with temperatures just shy of 100 degrees Fahrenheit, I escaped in the middle of July to the Davis Mountains in the Southwestern corner of the state of Texas, highs were in the low 80s, and overnights low were briskly cold. The Davis Mountains not only offers some of the most picturesque vistas throughout the entire state of Texas, the cooler temperatures had the land lushly green, which wasn’t something I was expecting to see.

 

The state park has two bird blinds, which are great for bird watchers, photographers, and the curious. This is where I nabbed this great shot of a Pine Siskin. Plus you can get a special pass for access to the park after dark to make use of the scenic overlook to enjoy some Dark Skies for some star gazing without camping over night there. In my case, rain storms came in during the night and rained out my plans for some night photography, but it’s a great resource I plan to use when I next make a try at night photography. The State Park is within line of sight of McDonald Observatory, if you look very carefully at the vista on the top right and bottom right, the tiny white dots on the top of that mountain in the difference is the Observatory.

In less than 15 minutes you leave the Davis Mountains State Park behind and can find yourself on the fringes of the Chihuahuan Desert, and a Nature Center that showcases the flora and fauna of the region’s desert. This is an important corridor for hummingbird migration, and scientists do tag the birds in their attempts to learn more about them.