Opening Night Reception at the Midwest Center for Photography

Midwest Center for Photography‘s 10th Annual “TEN X TEN Small Works Exhibition”

Opening Night Reception:

  • Friday, November 24, 2017
  • from 7-9pm
  • at the Midwest Center for Photography
  • 1215 Franklin in Wichita, Kansas

 

 

Photographs are on exhibition in the gallery through December 31st, and are also featured for sale online. To order online, please visit: http://www.mwcponline.com/tenth-ten-x-ten.html to purchase direct from the gallery who will package and ship straight to your door.

I’m thrilled to number among the 26 international photographers who have had work selected for the Midwest Center for Photography‘s 10th Annual “TEN X TEN Small Works Exhibition”, which focuses on offering affordable fine art photography works that are ten inches by ten inches in dimension.

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Bear Mountain Suspension Bridge

Recently I got to spend a week in the Hudson River Valley, and while exploring the region I also crossed the Bear Mountain Suspension Bridge, which carries US 6/US 202 across the Hudson River between Rockland/Orange Counties and Westchester/Putnam Counties. At one point in time, specifically in 1924 and part of 1925, it held the record for the longest suspension bridge in the road. The bridge is flanked with a pedestrian walkway as well, so I couldn’t resist the opportunity to park and walk across it. Granted, with storm clouds on the horizon, the more I walked out towards the middle the more I was being plastered against the railing by the force of the wind tunneling between the mountains. I didn’t go all the way across, I figured half way in those nerve-wracking conditions was good enough.

While I tend towards nature photography, I do enjoy some more architecturally flavored photography from time to time, playing with light and shadow, geometrics, positive and negative space, and geometric shapes can be rather entertaining for a photographer.

 

 

 

Selected into the Midwest Center for Photography Small Works Exhibition

Notifications went out today on who made it into the Midwest Center for Photography‘s 10th Annual “TEN X TEN Small Works Exhibition” and I’m thrilled to say I number among the 26 international photographers who have had work selected for the show. “TEN X TEN” focuses on offering affordable works that are ten inches by ten inches in dimension, and sell for $100 each.

There will be a reception on opening night Friday, November 24th from 7-9pm at 1215 Franklin in Wichita, Kansas. Photographs are on exhibition in the gallery through December 31st, and are also featured for sale online. To order online, please visit: http://www.mwcponline.com/tenth-ten-x-ten.html to purchase direct from the gallery who will package and ship straight to your door.

Here’s the complete list of exhibiting artists:
Antonio Castilho, Lisbon, Portugal; Dave Conkling, Grinnell, IA; Jim Davis, Fairfield, IA; Rachel Deutmeyer, Ames, IA; Jon Dunning, Cambridge, England, UK; Zachary Endter, Vienna, Austria; Jane Feely, Highland Park, IL; Kari Grogan, Concordia, KS; Jim Hammer, Wichita, KS; Douglas Hill, Los Angeles, CA; Charles Hively, Brooklyn, NY; Sophia Howard, Fort Worth, TX; Stephen Howard, Wichita, KS; K. C. Hulsman, Hurst, TX; Barbara Kantz, East Setauket, NY; Fran Lattanzio, Terra Haute, IN; Lauren Lopez, Richardson, TX; Jenna Lynch, Mahopac, NY; Holly McCaslin, Wichita, KS; Dan McCormack, Accord, NY; Lisa Mitchell, Lincs, England, UK; Jennifer Murray, Chicago, IL; Eric Rennie, Cromwell, CT; Linda Robinson, Wichita, KS; Natalie Weber, Glenview, IL; and Michelle Yanga, Howell, MI.

2017 IAA Photography Exhibition – Now Open with Reception this Sunday

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The 2017 IAA Photography Expedition has now opened, and will run through December 1st at the Jaycee Parks Center for the Arts in Irving, Texas. The show is free and open to the public. I feel honored that one of my pieces (Turn Back Time) was selected to participate in this photography competition juried by Mark Thompson. The exhibition contains 75 pieces in total from 44 different regional photographers.

HulsmanKC_02_Time

 

AWARDS CEREMONY & RECEPTION

  • Sunday, November 5th
  • From 2 – 4 pm
  • At the Jaycee Parks Center for the Arts
  • 1975 Puritan Drive in Irving, Texas

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I hope you will join all of us during the Reception and Awards Ceremony for the 2017 Irving Art Association’s Photography Exhibition featuring many talented regional photographers, including not only myself but fellow Grapevine Art Project member Klaus Mayer. The preview gallery for all the selected works can be viewed on the IAA’s official website here.

 

 

GAP’s Winter Wonderland Art Show

I’ve got 4 different outlets this month where my photography is on exhibit. One of them now open to the public is at the historic Palace Arts Center in Grapevine where my photograph I took of Beacon Falls in the Hudson River Valley in New York entitled Bridge Over Troubled Waters is on display. It is but one work among many of the other talented works by members from the Grapevine Art Project. The show is free and open to the public.

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GAP WINTER WONDERLAND

The show runs from November 1st – December 31st, at the Palace Arts Center located at 301 S. Main Street in Grapevine, Texas and is available to view Monday through Friday from 9am – 5pm, as well as during other special events at the PAC.

 

 

For more information about the historic Palace Arts Center please visit  here.

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Marfa, Texas – One “Giant” Movie, & The Arts

As mentioned previously, Marfa’s claim to fame:

  1. the movie Giant was filmed here
  2. it’s a well-known Arts destination

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Giant (1956) was directed by Hollywood artistic juggernaut George Stevens (who won an Academy Award for Best Director for his work on the film), and earned a total of 9 Academy Nominations for work both behind and in front of the screen. Starring Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson, and James Dean in his last role (and only third film) before his untimely death. Even though the film came out in the 1956, there continues to be a dialogue about this cinemas Classic. There’s been at least two different documentaries: Return To Giant (2003), and Children of Giant (2015). Giant has withstood the test of time, because it dared to be about matters of substance. The film was ahead of its time as it spotlighted racial prejudice and segregation against latinos. One only needs to turn the news on to see how these are still relevant issues today as the nation is indulged in conversations about Mexican Immigrants and DACA.

One of the go to tourists destinations is the restored Hotel Paisano. The Hotel was designed by famed architect Henry Trost in the 1920s. In the 1950s Hollywood came to the Hotel, when the movie Giant was in production. Many of the cast and crew stayed at the hotel, or made use of its amenities. Today there’s some film memorabilia up around the hotel, and there’s a number of small shops (including one that sells Giant film related merchandise), and a gallery attached to the hotel too.

 

Despite being a town of around 2000 residents, Marfa boasts well over a dozen art galleries, the most preeminent Art destination being the Chinati Foundation. While Marfa may feature numerous art galleries plus a number of retail shops specializing in artisan wares. Many of them have limited hours primarily focused to Friday – Sunday. I knew this going to the town, but even so I found half the places I tried to visit closed the Saturday I went. Between vacations, and galleries between installations my luck was not with me.

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Still I managed to make it to Book Marfa, which features a specially curated book store, artisan made goods, as well as a mini art gallery with works for sale. I love their regional book section. Anyone with an interest in ancient art especially of ancient man the book the White Shaman Mural is a must read.

The White Shaman Mural: An Enduring Creation Narrative in the Rock Art of the Lower Pecos by Carolyn E. Boyd, Kim Cox

Winner, Society for American Archarology Book Award, 2017

The prehistoric hunter-gatherers of the Lower Pecos Canyonlands of Texas and Coahuila, Mexico, created some of the most spectacularly complex, colorful, extensive, and enduring rock art of the ancient world. Perhaps the greatest of these masterpieces is the White Shaman mural, an intricate painting that spans some twenty-six feet in length and thirteen feet in height on the wall of a shallow cave overlooking the Pecos River. In The White Shaman Mural, Carolyn E. Boyd takes us on a journey of discovery as she builds a convincing case that the mural tells a story of the birth of the sun and the beginning of time—making it possibly the oldest pictorial creation narrative in North America.

Unlike previous scholars who have viewed Pecos rock art as random and indecipherable, Boyd demonstrates that the White Shaman mural was intentionally composed as a visual narrative, using a graphic vocabulary of images to communicate multiple levels of meaning and function. Drawing on twenty-five years of archaeological research and analysis, as well as insights from ethnohistory and art history, Boyd identifies patterns in the imagery that equate, in stunning detail, to the mythologies of Uto-Aztecan-speaking peoples, including the ancient Aztec and the present-day Huichol. This paradigm-shifting identification of core Mesoamerican beliefs in the Pecos rock art reveals that a shared ideological universe was already firmly established among foragers living in the Lower Pecos region as long as four thousand years ago.

I swung by the famous Ballroom Marfa for their installation at the time, and was rather taken by this artists use of electrical current through tobacco to the cooper sheet metal. I think in this case, it brings back fond memories of me working with copper during my metal & jewelry days. There was also an interesting exhibit that tackled political issues of identity as found in language and how various countries were using accents to authentic paperwork and grant or deny admittance to their country for foreigners. I also tried to visit the artisan retail fronts of both Freda,and the Wrong Store but they were also closed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

That’s so Marfa

When a mutual friend first introduced me to Mary Ann Glass a few years ago, I always remember how when Mary Ann learned I was from Texas the first thing she asked me is if I lived anywhere near Marfa, Texas. I recall thinking, where’s that? It would take a google search for me to find where it was in the state, and the answer to that is summed up in 3 letters: B-F-E.

The closest way to get to it is to fly into either El Paso, Texas or Midland, Texas, and then grab a car and drive a few more hours to get there. It’s in such a remote area of the state, and just on the edge of the Chihuahuan Desert (within a couple of hours of Big Bend National Park), it takes a hardy, and a bit of a unusual sort to want to call it home. In fact the town was created solely as a watering stop for the railroads.

Marfa, Texas is really only famous for three things:

  1. Movie Locations: Giant was filmed in the area with Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson,  Dennis Hopper, and in his final appearance James Dean; more recently the film No Country for Old Men was filmed in the area starring Tommy Lee Jones
  2. The Marfa Lights (atmospheric anomaly, some sort of bio-luminescence, swamp gas, ufos?)
  3. The Arts

The development of the arts was really galvanized in the 1970s when minimalist Donald Judd moved from New York City to Marfa for the express intention of finding a spot to permanently display his works. He would find an old abandoned World War II army base, and with help from New York’s Dia Foundation, he established the Chinati Foundation which displays both huge indoor and outdoor installations and is home to his outdoor Concrete series.

From the creative seed provided by Judd to the area, more artists soon began flocking to the area. Today, Marfa despite having a very small population of fewer than 2,000 according to the 2010 Census, has well over fifteen different art galleries, hosting artists from around the world. Marfa also now hosts a film festival too. The town has become synonymous with the arts, featuring many artisan boutiques and wares in the city, and nary a chain store anywhere to be seen.

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This is best embodied by the “White Shirt Marfa” just as it’s name suggests, it sells nothing but White Shirts, because apparently you can’t own enough of them. It can also be represented in Elmgreen and Dragset’s Prada Marfa, a pop culture land art installation, of a faux Prada store, with a door that isn’t functional. It’s been theorized to be the single most instagrammed location in the entire state. Of course, I couldn’t resist a Selfie either. It had just rained when I showed up, so I decided to take advantage of the mud and puddles, and stormy skies.

The town is so small, that most of the places a tourist might be interested in are closed except on the weekends. For this reason, I had intentionally left my exploring of the galleries and shops to Saturday, when everyone had hours listed as being open. Alas, in practice, over 2/3 of the galleries and shops I went to visit were closed, some permanently, some between installations, some on vacation.

The main reason I was in that part of the state is my cousin had invited me to a special weekend at McDonald Observatory in the nearby Davis Mountains, but when I realized Marfa was a short distance away from where I was staying in the neighboring town of Fort Davis, well I decided I ought to go give it a gander. Afterall, since I was in BFE, I might as well embrace the opportunity, as I have no idea if I’ll ever make it back.

You can look forward to installments of more photos in the near future from my travels to this part of the state.

One man’s junk, is another man’s treasure

As much as my personal preference is towards nature photography, sometimes I do enjoy the freedom of experimentation that comes when I decide to take items that represent manufacturing and engineering, that are gritty from rust, or left abandoned to decay. The freedom to play with them can be fun, as it’s trickier to find lines, and composition that still speaks in the colors, textures, shapes, and found objects.

CARS

 

TRACTORS

 

ABANDONED DECAY

 

 

FLEA MARKET FINDS – ROCKING MY WARHOL

 

SALVAGED

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Antiquated Charm

This year I made Castroville, Texas a must-see destination for my annual wildflower photography road trip. This is colloquially known as the Castroville Poppy House (located at 606 Florence Street) which is a private residence, that during select days and hours in early Spring is open to the public. This labor of love by the homeowners, is a gorgeous spot to visit, and it’s a photographer’s dream as there are so many vignettes. They have some old structures on the property including buildings from the 1800s and 1940s.

Many of the locals go there for family photos with their kids, and others make appointments for shooting: brides, engagement, graduation, prom photos and more! The homeowners ask for nothing in return except donations to the local VFW and American Legion chapters. The homeowners even collect the seeds, and in addition to re-seeding their own property, to distribute to others in Castroville in their attempt to paint the town red. This year they were doing a World War II theme, so they even found an old 48 Star American Flag to fly tacked up to the old barn.

I loved shooting here, and only wish that I was able to hit this location under better lighting conditions. Afternoon sun on a cloudless day in Texas is very harsh and hard to work with, even with a UV filter and lens hood the grass and flowers aren’t quite true to what I saw, and trying to tweak it in post-editing hasn’t been incredibly successful for me without it looking incredibly fake.

*sighs*

Golden hour lighting here would be magical.

 

 

In Flanders Fields

John McCrae, 18721918

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row, 
That mark our place, and in the sky, 
The larks, still bravely singing, fly, 
Scarce heard amid the guns below. 

We are the dead; short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow, 
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields. 

Take up our quarrel with the foe! 
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high! 
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

Westminster

While I may not enjoy all the camera gear I pack up with me when I travel, I relish the opportunity to take pictures while I am out and about. I was fortunate enough to be able to spend nearly 2 weeks in London a few winters back (December 2012 – January 2013).

 

One of the challenges is in both trying to capture those items that are seemingly, quintessentially, the local flavor, but also trying to find fresh, new takes on it too. Sometimes I’m just happy to take a shot of the landmark, but then I always try to challenge myself. Sometimes I succeed, sometimes I fail.

 

 

 

These are shots I took in the Westminster Area, I’m particularly proud of my close-up of the Westminster Bridge Lamp, as well as the shot from the bridge that includes both the Westminster Bridge Lamp and the London Eye. While I like the shot I took of the London Eye through the fence and branches, my friend who I was traveling with had opted for a landscape shot here, and it really elevated that shot and won her recognition in a photography contest.

 

 

 

 

New Year’s Fire Works on the Thames, from the back of the Savoy Hotel. I like the odd effect of the long exposure I gave the shot with the silhouette of a man, and some branches, with fireworks reflecting off the Thames behind him.