Grapevine Art Project’s Juried Art Exhibit at the Tower Gallery in Grapevine – Now Open

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I’m honored to say that I have 5 pieces on display [featured below] in the Grapevine Art Project‘s Juried Art Exhibit in the Tower Gallery inside the Grapevine Convention and Visitor’s Center located at 636 S. Main Street in downtown Grapevine, Texas.

The Free Exhibit runs April 6-26, 2018 and is full of art encompassing a range of mediums: jewelry, ceramics, photography, painting, block printing, textiles and so much more! If something catches your eye, guess what — it’s for sale too! Gallery hours coincide with the hours of the Visitor’s Center itself.

SHOW DATES

  • April 6-26

LOCATION

  • Tower Gallery
  • inside the Grapevine Convention & Visitor’s Center
  • 636 S. Main Street in Grapevine, Texas

GALLERY HOURS

  • Mon – Fri: 8am – 5:30pm
  • Sat: 10am – 6:30pm, (until 7pm on the 21st)
  • Sun: 12-5pm

On April 14, 15, 20, & 21 GAP will be hosting artist demonstrations, as well as “Make and Takes” for youth and young adults. Spots are limited to a first come first serve basis and there is a modest fee.

As part of a new initiative, GAP is raising money to be used for an Art Scholarship Fund to help support a graduating senior for our local Grapevine Colleyville Independent School District. On the evening of April 14th there will be a Wine Trail drawing for some nice items, and a Silent Auction. The next Saturday on April 21 there will be another Silent Auction during the Artist’s Reception from 5-7pm.

ARTIST RECEPTION

  • Saturday, April 21st from 5-7pm

Unfortunately for me, I will not be at the Artist Reception on April 21st, since it happens to coincide with my appearance at the Main ST Fort Worth Arts Festival. But many of the other artists will be on hand to talk about their art and process, plus there’s free refreshments too.So if you’re not visiting me at my booth in Fort Worth, then I’d recommend you pop in for an evening of art!

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3rd Annual Conroe Art League National Invitational Show

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Wide Open Spaces – Taken July 2017 in Valentine, Texas (near Prada Marfa)

I’m pleased to announce that out of a multitude of submissions from across the United States, my work, Wide Open Spaces, will be part of the 3rd Annual Conroe Art League National Invitational Show featuring 100 artistic pieces from 95 artists as selected by Juror Peter Andrew, Professor of Art at Stephen F. Austin State University.

Mr. Andrew is a Fulbright Fellow and member of the New York Society of Illustrators. He is also a working artist with the Liquitex Acrylic’s Artist’s Outreach Program. As an accomplished figurative and abstract painter, his work has been featured in over fifty solo shows and two hundred group shows. His paintings have been exhibited at three Presidential Inaugural Galas in Washington, DC. His commissions have included such clients as Amegy Bank, Houston Methodist Hospital and Fort Belvoir US Army Hospital, Virginia. See more about Peter and his art at www.peterandrew.net.

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The 3rd Annual Conroe Art League National Invitational Show 

 

 

  • March 7-31, 2018
  • The Gallery at the Madeley Building
  • 127 Simonton Street in Conroe, Texas

 Artist Reception and Award Ceremony

  • on Saturday, March 24 from 5:00 – 8:00 pm

 

 

 

GAP’s Winter Wonderland Art Show

I’ve got 4 different outlets this month where my photography is on exhibit. One of them now open to the public is at the historic Palace Arts Center in Grapevine where my photograph I took of Beacon Falls in the Hudson River Valley in New York entitled Bridge Over Troubled Waters is on display. It is but one work among many of the other talented works by members from the Grapevine Art Project. The show is free and open to the public.

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GAP WINTER WONDERLAND

The show runs from November 1st – December 31st, at the Palace Arts Center located at 301 S. Main Street in Grapevine, Texas and is available to view Monday through Friday from 9am – 5pm, as well as during other special events at the PAC.

 

 

For more information about the historic Palace Arts Center please visit  here.

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The Fort Davis Area of Texas

Fort Davis is a very small town with a population of 1200 (2010 Census), and has the highest elevation in the entire state for any Texas county-seat at 5,050 feet above sea level. It’s really known for

  1. The National Fort Davis Historic Site, which preserves the best remaining examples of old US ARMY Forts from the Southwestern United States. Fort Davis was established in 1854.
  2. McDonald Observatory, while key scientific discoveries and research occurs at the site, this observatory is one of the few in the world that invites the public to special programs like their Sky Parties.
  3. Davis Mountains State Park
  4. Chihuahuan Desert Nature Center & Botanical Garden

 

While the Dallas / Fort Worth area was skirting with temperatures just shy of 100 degrees Fahrenheit, I escaped in the middle of July to the Davis Mountains in the Southwestern corner of the state of Texas, highs were in the low 80s, and overnights low were briskly cold. The Davis Mountains not only offers some of the most picturesque vistas throughout the entire state of Texas, the cooler temperatures had the land lushly green, which wasn’t something I was expecting to see.

 

The state park has two bird blinds, which are great for bird watchers, photographers, and the curious. This is where I nabbed this great shot of a Pine Siskin. Plus you can get a special pass for access to the park after dark to make use of the scenic overlook to enjoy some Dark Skies for some star gazing without camping over night there. In my case, rain storms came in during the night and rained out my plans for some night photography, but it’s a great resource I plan to use when I next make a try at night photography. The State Park is within line of sight of McDonald Observatory, if you look very carefully at the vista on the top right and bottom right, the tiny white dots on the top of that mountain in the difference is the Observatory.

In less than 15 minutes you leave the Davis Mountains State Park behind and can find yourself on the fringes of the Chihuahuan Desert, and a Nature Center that showcases the flora and fauna of the region’s desert. This is an important corridor for hummingbird migration, and scientists do tag the birds in their attempts to learn more about them.

 

 

 

Spring is in the Air

I’ve been slowly recovering from a knee injury, which has suspended a great deal of my plans for wildflower photography this Spring. Unfortunately, I missed peak bloom down in the Ennis area, but I decided to go there today and try my luck hoping there be a few small vignettes I could work with. More than 95% of the Bluebonnets have gone to seed or have been overtaken by the grass. While there were a few lovely spots with primroses, they were in locations where there was no naturally flattering composition available at that spot. And fields of flowers don’t look like field of flowers unless you can compose them just right.

One of the spots I did have luck, was a small fenced in private pasture on Mach Road, the Bluebonnets there were thick, lush, and tall. If not at peak, they’re just a bit past peak and they were surrounded with some sprinklings of pink, yellow, and even a touch of white from some other wildflowers which intensified the blue of the bluebonnets themselves.

I was working on a composition, when suddenly I noticed a mule/donkey walking towards me. I was like, ok I can work with this. But that meant I was changing from a landscape shot, to a wildlife shot, so I switched out my camera lens accordingly. So I was trying to line up a shot testing my setting on my camera with the new lens, snapping some shots, when I noticed what I had captured. I was just photobombed by a pair of exhibitionists.

The perils of nature photography.

Appreciating Man-Made Objects in Photography

Nature is what drew me first as the subject I most desired to capture in my viewfinder. The world around us, from it’s unique geologies, to local flora and fauna can just fill you with awe–or at least it does me. But so many times when I would have a picture framed in my viewfinder of seemingly pristine nature there would be some man-made structure popping up and ruining the shot I wanted: power lines, water towers, buildings, or just the detritus of wind-tossed litter.

It would take me many years to begin to see how even man-made objects could have their own beauty. But if Ansel Adams who was known for creating such masterworks of nature in black and white, could also tackle man-made objects with beauty… I suppose it was only a matter of time that my own eye would develop and begin to embrace at least selective moments of such photography myself. Even so, I still usually prefer nature to man-made objects. 🙂

Various Works by Ansel Adams

 

 

 

Some of my own works

Texas Wildflowers – Part 6

A hodge podge of some of the other wildflowers you can find growing across the Texas countryside: wild sunflowers, horsemint (bee balm), Yucca, Prickly Pear Cactus in bloom, coneflower, and more. So many fields are over taken by yellow flowers, unfortunately they’re a challenge to photograph as usually temperatures are such the grass is no longer quite as verdantly green when compared to early spring, and with green and yellow being complimentary colors, you don’t have the deep contrast that can help make both colors really vivid when taking a photograph.

 

Winter Wonderlands

As a Texan, I like to tell people that in my part of the state we have three seasons: Baking Drought, Torrential Downpour, and Wind Chill. It is a very rare site indeed for snow to fall in the Dallas / Fort Worth area. We tend to have ice storms, more than snow storms, and even those storms are a rare occurrence. This year in particular we’ve had a very mild winter, even the days around Christmas this year I was wearing summer clothes when the temperature reached into the 80s.

So while I did not get to enjoy a winter in my area this year, one of my guilty pleasures is traveling abroad to the Hudson River Valley and enjoying the sights of winter there. Some of these photos are from a recent trip January 2017, and others are from several years ago.

 

Texas Wildflowers – Part 4

 

In addition to the orange-red hues of Indian Paintbrushes, there are also some cousin flowers known as Prairie Paintbrush, the later appears in a range of hues including yellow, pale pink, peach, fuschia and shades in between. While these are found in Texas, they also can be found as far north as Kansas and Missouri.

I was on the 501 between Pontotoc and Cherokee in the Texas Hill Country, when I stumbled along some roadside blooms that had a range of the prairie paintbrush blooming against the Texas state wildflower: the Bluebonnet.

The image with the footpath, comes from Tandy Hills Natural Area in Fort Worth, Texas. Located just minutes from downtown, it preserverves over 160 acres of native prairie, and you can find some spectatcular sunsets here, especially during the blooming season. Milkweed in endless varieties is prevalent, and milkweed is the favorite food (as well as place to cocoon) for the Monarch Butterfly.

 

 

Texas Wildflowers – Part 2

While Texas Bluebonnets are always crowd-pleasers, one of the other more populous Texas Wildflowers, would be the Indian Paintbrush, which possesses an orange to red hue with creme tips. Indian Paintbrushes in a normal year tend to start blooming as the Bluebonnets begin to peak and fade. They tend to reach similar heights to the bluebonnets, and can offer some great contrast which can really help to really bring out the blue hues in the Bluebonnet.

 

 

For more:

Texas Wildflowers – Part 1