Call me a Monarchist! I just adore this butterfly.

As a long time resident of the Dallas / Fort Worth area I’ve long been aware of a pair of fluttering orange and black wings that are seen during two key times throughout the year: Spring and Fall. The Monarch Butterfly winters in Mexico, but when temperatures rise in the Spring they begin their northern journey into the United States and the Southern most portions of Canada.

spring
Source: http://www.monarchwatch.org

In Autumn, the butterflies migrate south so they can spend the winter in Mexico.

fall
Source: http://www.monarchwatch.org

Their Winter nest is so laden with butterflies, it’s as if the trees in lieu of leaves have butterflies instead. Truly it’s a marvel. Scientists estimate that 6 out of every 10 butterflies die from starvation en route due to the loss of native habitat and native wildflowers that produce sustaining nectar. Here’s a short video on how you can help to preserve this annual wonder, plus some amazing photos of the Mexican winter home. Watch it on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kuMASSrli9A

There’s even a research site trying to tag and track them to more thoroughly map their migration patterns and routes over at MonarchWatch.org. Thanks to them you can get an idea of their Spring and Fall migration maps as seen above.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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An Embarrassment of Riches

The Cleburne Camera Club’s 2017 Photo Contest and Exhibition Sale has an embarrassment of riches with striking photos from a range of photographers, including some very talented youth. And I’m not just saying that because I have 3 pieces in the show.

Awards were announced at the Opening Day reception on April 29th. The show runs through May 26th, and is free and open to the public for viewing from Monday – Saturday during 10am – 4pm daily at the JN Long Cultural Arts Complex located at 425 Granbury Street in Cleburne, Texas.

 

Be it a Bird, Bees, or Flowers – Take Them Home Today!

Several of my pieces are currently available at RiverWinds Gallery in New York.

  1. Quoth the Raven – boldly features a raven from the Tower of London. The photo shows every individual feather, every contour, the ridged eye, the delineation of the beak, and even drops of water beading on the Corvus.
  2. Monet’s Dream – showcases water lilies framed by wind-agitated water reflecting the partially cloudy sky amidst the looming branches of tall pine trees.
  3. Keeping Beezy – stars some contented pollinators. Not only is there great color in this piece from the beautiful pink bloom, but you can see the veins in the wings of the bees as well.

 

Since it’s so hard to fully see the detail in these photos showing the works in situ at the gallery, I’ve also included the images, unencumbered, so you can see what’s framed behind the glass better in the slideshow below.

 

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RiverWinds Gallery is located at 172 Main Street in Beacon, New York. They are also happy to do mail orders as well, so if you can’t visit in person you can always call them to inquiry at: 845.838.2880.