Bear Mountain Suspension Bridge

Recently I got to spend a week in the Hudson River Valley, and while exploring the region I also crossed the Bear Mountain Suspension Bridge, which carries US 6/US 202 across the Hudson River between Rockland/Orange Counties and Westchester/Putnam Counties. At one point in time, specifically in 1924 and part of 1925, it held the record for the longest suspension bridge in the road. The bridge is flanked with a pedestrian walkway as well, so I couldn’t resist the opportunity to park and walk across it. Granted, with storm clouds on the horizon, the more I walked out towards the middle the more I was being plastered against the railing by the force of the wind tunneling between the mountains. I didn’t go all the way across, I figured half way in those nerve-wracking conditions was good enough.

While I tend towards nature photography, I do enjoy some more architecturally flavored photography from time to time, playing with light and shadow, geometrics, positive and negative space, and geometric shapes can be rather entertaining for a photographer.

 

 

 

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Owl’right, Owl’right, Owl’right.

I love going to the Hudson River Valley in New York, not only does a very dear friend live there, but the countryside is beautiful and there’s so much natural beauty all around you. Considering the local environs, it’s really no surprise that it’s been an inspiration source for so many artists, and famous even for the Hudson River School, which is credited for being the first coherent American art style, which was very prevalent in the 19th Century and has a legacy that still influences and inspires artists today. The style was known for natural landscapes, and celebrating the environmental wonders and work of the divine found in the world around us as typified by a long list of prominent artists, some of which can be found here.
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The atmosphere of this image gives the impression of snow, but the white flecks in the background were some sort of fungus growing inside this hollowed out tree.While the mood of the image seems to suggest Winter, I took this shot on a recent autumn trip where it was in the mid 70s outside.
 
I’m not sure, but I believe this is a Barred Owl. If anyone knows for sure, could you please let me know?
 
 

GAP’s Winter Wonderland Art Show

I’ve got 4 different outlets this month where my photography is on exhibit. One of them now open to the public is at the historic Palace Arts Center in Grapevine where my photograph I took of Beacon Falls in the Hudson River Valley in New York entitled Bridge Over Troubled Waters is on display. It is but one work among many of the other talented works by members from the Grapevine Art Project. The show is free and open to the public.

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GAP WINTER WONDERLAND

The show runs from November 1st – December 31st, at the Palace Arts Center located at 301 S. Main Street in Grapevine, Texas and is available to view Monday through Friday from 9am – 5pm, as well as during other special events at the PAC.

 

 

For more information about the historic Palace Arts Center please visit  here.

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Appreciating Man-Made Objects in Photography

Nature is what drew me first as the subject I most desired to capture in my viewfinder. The world around us, from it’s unique geologies, to local flora and fauna can just fill you with awe–or at least it does me. But so many times when I would have a picture framed in my viewfinder of seemingly pristine nature there would be some man-made structure popping up and ruining the shot I wanted: power lines, water towers, buildings, or just the detritus of wind-tossed litter.

It would take me many years to begin to see how even man-made objects could have their own beauty. But if Ansel Adams who was known for creating such masterworks of nature in black and white, could also tackle man-made objects with beauty… I suppose it was only a matter of time that my own eye would develop and begin to embrace at least selective moments of such photography myself. Even so, I still usually prefer nature to man-made objects. 🙂

Various Works by Ansel Adams

 

 

 

Some of my own works

Winter Wonderlands

As a Texan, I like to tell people that in my part of the state we have three seasons: Baking Drought, Torrential Downpour, and Wind Chill. It is a very rare site indeed for snow to fall in the Dallas / Fort Worth area. We tend to have ice storms, more than snow storms, and even those storms are a rare occurrence. This year in particular we’ve had a very mild winter, even the days around Christmas this year I was wearing summer clothes when the temperature reached into the 80s.

So while I did not get to enjoy a winter in my area this year, one of my guilty pleasures is traveling abroad to the Hudson River Valley and enjoying the sights of winter there. Some of these photos are from a recent trip January 2017, and others are from several years ago.