3rd Annual Conroe Art League National Invitational Show

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Wide Open Spaces – Taken July 2017 in Valentine, Texas (near Prada Marfa)

I’m pleased to announce that out of a multitude of submissions from across the United States, my work, Wide Open Spaces, will be part of the 3rd Annual Conroe Art League National Invitational Show featuring 100 artistic pieces from 95 artists as selected by Juror Peter Andrew, Professor of Art at Stephen F. Austin State University.

Mr. Andrew is a Fulbright Fellow and member of the New York Society of Illustrators. He is also a working artist with the Liquitex Acrylic’s Artist’s Outreach Program. As an accomplished figurative and abstract painter, his work has been featured in over fifty solo shows and two hundred group shows. His paintings have been exhibited at three Presidential Inaugural Galas in Washington, DC. His commissions have included such clients as Amegy Bank, Houston Methodist Hospital and Fort Belvoir US Army Hospital, Virginia. See more about Peter and his art at www.peterandrew.net.

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The 3rd Annual Conroe Art League National Invitational Show 

 

 

  • March 7-31, 2018
  • The Gallery at the Madeley Building
  • 127 Simonton Street in Conroe, Texas

 Artist Reception and Award Ceremony

  • on Saturday, March 24 from 5:00 – 8:00 pm

 

 

 

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The Fort Davis Area of Texas

Fort Davis is a very small town with a population of 1200 (2010 Census), and has the highest elevation in the entire state for any Texas county-seat at 5,050 feet above sea level. It’s really known for

  1. The National Fort Davis Historic Site, which preserves the best remaining examples of old US ARMY Forts from the Southwestern United States. Fort Davis was established in 1854.
  2. McDonald Observatory, while key scientific discoveries and research occurs at the site, this observatory is one of the few in the world that invites the public to special programs like their Sky Parties.
  3. Davis Mountains State Park
  4. Chihuahuan Desert Nature Center & Botanical Garden

 

While the Dallas / Fort Worth area was skirting with temperatures just shy of 100 degrees Fahrenheit, I escaped in the middle of July to the Davis Mountains in the Southwestern corner of the state of Texas, highs were in the low 80s, and overnights low were briskly cold. The Davis Mountains not only offers some of the most picturesque vistas throughout the entire state of Texas, the cooler temperatures had the land lushly green, which wasn’t something I was expecting to see.

 

The state park has two bird blinds, which are great for bird watchers, photographers, and the curious. This is where I nabbed this great shot of a Pine Siskin. Plus you can get a special pass for access to the park after dark to make use of the scenic overlook to enjoy some Dark Skies for some star gazing without camping over night there. In my case, rain storms came in during the night and rained out my plans for some night photography, but it’s a great resource I plan to use when I next make a try at night photography. The State Park is within line of sight of McDonald Observatory, if you look very carefully at the vista on the top right and bottom right, the tiny white dots on the top of that mountain in the difference is the Observatory.

In less than 15 minutes you leave the Davis Mountains State Park behind and can find yourself on the fringes of the Chihuahuan Desert, and a Nature Center that showcases the flora and fauna of the region’s desert. This is an important corridor for hummingbird migration, and scientists do tag the birds in their attempts to learn more about them.

 

 

 

Monument Valley

Monument Valley was made famous by Westerns made in the heyday of classic Hollywood. The area is strongly associated with John Wayne, and continues to be used in film today. More recent examples include the Lone Ranger film with Johnny Depp in it. The iconic geology gives it that essence of “Western and Desolate” filmmakers are looking for. Much of Monument Valley is nestled within the Diné (Navajo) Nation. So I grabbed a Navajo guide and got to explore the area, including an area with Anasazi petroglyphs.