Acceptance to the 2017 Irving Art Association National Animal Art Juried Exhibition

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I’m thrilled to announce my inclusion into the Irving Art Association’s 2017 IAA National Animal Art Juried Exhibition by the juror Patsy Lindamood.

This year over 101 artists entered across various mediums, each artist had the potential to submit multiple works. Only 65 pieces are in the final show, 2 of which I’m thrilled to say are mine–specifically, two images in my Texas Longhorn series.

 

The Show is Open to the Public:

  • August 27 – September 29, 2017
  • Jaycee Park Center for the Arts
    • 1975 Puritan Drive
    • Irving TX 75061
  • Gallery Hours
    • Sunday, Monday, Wednesday & Thursday: 1-4pm
    • Tuesday: 10:30am – 3pm

Awards Ceremony & Reception:

  • Sunday, September 10, 2017
  • from 2- 4pm
  • Jaycee Park Center for the Arts in Irving, Texas.

 

There is construction in the area, so best to check for the latest directions and road closures before you head out.

Please save the date and plan to come out and support the arts!

Summer Blues – Peacocks & Feathers

On a recent trip to Austin, Texas I decided to swing by one of the city’s hidden gems, the Mayfield Park which features cottage style gardens, ponds of waterlilies, and peacocks roaming the grounds. I was there for about 2 hours waiting for a magical moment, and then finally one of the peacocks decided to spread their magnificent plumage in a full display. Nature Photography is part planning, part skill, part patience, and part luck. Of course I remembered one of the most crucial tenets of nature photography, don’t forget to look behind you, and don’t forget to look up, which helped me notice one particular peacock hanging out in a trees branches around 16 feet above me.

 

Wild Sunflowers

I’ve had the worst luck this year when it comes to my wildflower photography. I either miss peak bloom and arrive as the flowers have gone to seed, or the flowers have been mowed/harvested. I just missed most of the sunflowers in the Waxahachie to Ennis area in Texas by a couple of days this year. By the time I arrived the heat had doomed the agriculturally grown sunflowers into a drooping slump with the exception of a handful of blooms that were still upright. But at least the field had some wild sunflowers still thriving amongst the done for commercial cousins.

How can you tell the difference between wild sunflowers, and commercial ones? Easy: commercial ones have a flower that’s about the size of a human head, and wild ones are about the size of a human palm to hand.

These were taken in a multi-acre field adjacent to the Texas Motorway in Ennis, Texas on June 14, 2017.

 

 

New Greeting Cards debut at Grapevine’s Main Street Days

My 5″ x 5″ greeting cards arrived. They’re printed on specialty metallic pearl paper, giving each card a shimmer (which I tried to capture in the video I posted to my Facebook page). The cards will make their debut at my booth during this year’s Main Street Days in Grapevine, Texas held May 19 -21, I’ll be inside the Foust Event space.

One card for $5, or five cards for $20 (tax included).

Each comes with a matching envelope.

 

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Spring is in the Air

I’ve been slowly recovering from a knee injury, which has suspended a great deal of my plans for wildflower photography this Spring. Unfortunately, I missed peak bloom down in the Ennis area, but I decided to go there today and try my luck hoping there be a few small vignettes I could work with. More than 95% of the Bluebonnets have gone to seed or have been overtaken by the grass. While there were a few lovely spots with primroses, they were in locations where there was no naturally flattering composition available at that spot. And fields of flowers don’t look like field of flowers unless you can compose them just right.

One of the spots I did have luck, was a small fenced in private pasture on Mach Road, the Bluebonnets there were thick, lush, and tall. If not at peak, they’re just a bit past peak and they were surrounded with some sprinklings of pink, yellow, and even a touch of white from some other wildflowers which intensified the blue of the bluebonnets themselves.

I was working on a composition, when suddenly I noticed a mule/donkey walking towards me. I was like, ok I can work with this. But that meant I was changing from a landscape shot, to a wildlife shot, so I switched out my camera lens accordingly. So I was trying to line up a shot testing my setting on my camera with the new lens, snapping some shots, when I noticed what I had captured. I was just photobombed by a pair of exhibitionists.

The perils of nature photography.