Window Shopping

Two of my pieces (Monet’s Dream – a lovely photograph of some water lilies, and Keeping Beezy – two bees on a giant pink flower) have been moved upfront to the window display at RiverWinds Gallery at 172 Main Street in Beacon, New York.

Not in the area? No problem, the gallery is to assist mail order customers.

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Appreciating Man-Made Objects in Photography

Nature is what drew me first as the subject I most desired to capture in my viewfinder. The world around us, from it’s unique geologies, to local flora and fauna can just fill you with awe–or at least it does me. But so many times when I would have a picture framed in my viewfinder of seemingly pristine nature there would be some man-made structure popping up and ruining the shot I wanted: power lines, water towers, buildings, or just the detritus of wind-tossed litter.

It would take me many years to begin to see how even man-made objects could have their own beauty. But if Ansel Adams who was known for creating such masterworks of nature in black and white, could also tackle man-made objects with beauty… I suppose it was only a matter of time that my own eye would develop and begin to embrace at least selective moments of such photography myself. Even so, I still usually prefer nature to man-made objects. 🙂

Various Works by Ansel Adams

 

 

 

Some of my own works

Winter Wonderlands

As a Texan, I like to tell people that in my part of the state we have three seasons: Baking Drought, Torrential Downpour, and Wind Chill. It is a very rare site indeed for snow to fall in the Dallas / Fort Worth area. We tend to have ice storms, more than snow storms, and even those storms are a rare occurrence. This year in particular we’ve had a very mild winter, even the days around Christmas this year I was wearing summer clothes when the temperature reached into the 80s.

So while I did not get to enjoy a winter in my area this year, one of my guilty pleasures is traveling abroad to the Hudson River Valley and enjoying the sights of winter there. Some of these photos are from a recent trip January 2017, and others are from several years ago.

 

Be it a Bird, Bees, or Flowers – Take Them Home Today!

Several of my pieces are currently available at RiverWinds Gallery in New York.

  1. Quoth the Raven – boldly features a raven from the Tower of London. The photo shows every individual feather, every contour, the ridged eye, the delineation of the beak, and even drops of water beading on the Corvus.
  2. Monet’s Dream – showcases water lilies framed by wind-agitated water reflecting the partially cloudy sky amidst the looming branches of tall pine trees.
  3. Keeping Beezy – stars some contented pollinators. Not only is there great color in this piece from the beautiful pink bloom, but you can see the veins in the wings of the bees as well.

 

Since it’s so hard to fully see the detail in these photos showing the works in situ at the gallery, I’ve also included the images, unencumbered, so you can see what’s framed behind the glass better in the slideshow below.

 

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RiverWinds Gallery is located at 172 Main Street in Beacon, New York. They are also happy to do mail orders as well, so if you can’t visit in person you can always call them to inquiry at: 845.838.2880.

 

 

How Metropolitan

One of my favorite places to go when I’m in New York is the Metropolitan Museum of Art. As much as I enjoy their Medieval Collection housed at the Cloisters, and their Asian Art to spend a day, I particularly love their antiquities collection including works from ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome.

One of the highlights of my visits is the Temple of Dendur, which was preserved in part due to Jacqueline Kennedy. She helped Egypt preserve the Abu Simbel Temple, a UNESCO site that would end up flooded from a man-made reservoir the government was needing to build. In return Egypt wanted to give a gift, and that gift, chosen by Jackie, was the Temple of Dendur which is now housed within the MET.  This trip, the museum also had the massive Athena statue from Pergammon on loan and display (as well as some other works), and Athena towers over you in the main lobby as a greeter to the sacred halls of art. Since I’ve seen the Pergammon altar that resides now in Berlin a few years ago, seeing this was like another piece of the puzzle.

At one point I got a bit lost among the modern art. The window not only reflected back the artwork on the wall, but it also had a winter landscape view of Central Park, and the silhouette of the city skyline as the sun began descending. I found the juxtaposition of inside and outside, solidity and transparency intriguing.

 

 

These images are not available for purchase, per the museum’s photography policies.