Historic flooding postpones Western Trappings on the Llano

This year’s Western Trappings on the Llano, which is a juried, international exhibit and sale featuring the finest in custom Gear and original Western Art has been postponed.

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As I’m sure many of you are aware, the flooding in Llano and neighboring communities in the Texas Hillcountry has made national news. The Llano River which cuts right through the heart of the town of Llano experienced a historic crest of more than 40 feet above normal.

 

To give you an idea of what that looks like this image combines a screencap from footage broadcasted on the news, and the an image I found from a news article of the bridge during normal conditions (with a person in it to help provide a sense of scale).

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The museum hosting Western Trappings on the Llano is located at the end of the bridge. The below image was shared to me on Facebook from a local. The photo was taken from the museum parking lot, and we can see that the museum grounds were flooding. It damaged the log cabin on site, but the main Museum building was just a tad higher and has managed to stay dry, though the flooded river water was lapping within reach of the foundation. In fact the sidewalk leading to the museum is just to the right of the structure visible on the right hand edge of the image.

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While the exhibit has already been hung in anticipation of the original reception and exhibit dates, due to the flooding everything has been pushed back 2 weeks to allow roads to be cleared, bridges inspected for damage, and to help the city get back up and running as they deal with the aftermath of all that water.

The new dates for Western Trappings on the Llano, held inside the Llano County Historical Museum located at 310 Bessemer Street in Llano, Texas are as follows:

  • Artist Reception (ticket required) on November 2nd at 5:30pm
  • Art Exhibit runs from November 3 through November 17

 

For more information please visit the official website: www.westerntrappings.com

 

 

 

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Juried Into Western Trappings on the Llano

 

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I’m thrilled to announce that I have been selected to exhibit two of my photographic works at this year’s Western Trappings on the Llano, which is a juried, international exhibit and sale featuring the finest in custom Gear and original Western Art. An artist reception and preview sale will kick off festivities on October 19th at 5:30pm (ticket required) inside the Llano County Historical Museum located at 310 Bessemer Street in Llano, Texas. The exhibit, which is free and open to the public, will run from October 20 through November 3, 2018 at the museum.

 

For more information please visit the official website: www.westerntrappings.com

Doe, a Deer, a Female Deer

What has slowly become tradition is trekking across the Texas Hillcountry every Spring and Summer, in hopes of finding magical vistas, flora and fauna to snap in my viewfinder. On one of the legs of my recent photography trip, I got lost somewhere between San Saba, Cherokee, and Lampasas on April 6, 2017. So there I was in the Texas Hillcountry near sunset when I came across a large herd of deer. I caught this image of a very pregnant doe, and I adore the painterly effect of this photograph.

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Texas Wildflowers – Part 6

A hodge podge of some of the other wildflowers you can find growing across the Texas countryside: wild sunflowers, horsemint (bee balm), Yucca, Prickly Pear Cactus in bloom, coneflower, and more. So many fields are over taken by yellow flowers, unfortunately they’re a challenge to photograph as usually temperatures are such the grass is no longer quite as verdantly green when compared to early spring, and with green and yellow being complimentary colors, you don’t have the deep contrast that can help make both colors really vivid when taking a photograph.

 

Texas Wildflowers – Part 5

It’s so amazing how in a period of 4-6 weeks the wildflowers can change so drastically in the Texas Hill Country. Bluebonnets and Indian Paintbrushes have faded, and now up comes other flowers like Indian Blankets (aka Firewheels), thistles, Horsemint (aka Bee Balm) and Mexican Hats (a type of coneflower) . I found this field June 8, 2016 along 71 just west of Spicewood and Cypress Creek. I stopped off and from the fence was taking pictures of the field, when I heard an engine idling behind me, the owner had come home from one of his other fields they farmed. The farm has been in the family since the 1800s, and the farmer couldn’t remember a year where the field was so overtaken by the horsemint. He even insisted my friends and I go home with some.

 

 

Texas Wildflowers – Part 4

 

In addition to the orange-red hues of Indian Paintbrushes, there are also some cousin flowers known as Prairie Paintbrush, the later appears in a range of hues including yellow, pale pink, peach, fuschia and shades in between. While these are found in Texas, they also can be found as far north as Kansas and Missouri.

I was on the 501 between Pontotoc and Cherokee in the Texas Hill Country, when I stumbled along some roadside blooms that had a range of the prairie paintbrush blooming against the Texas state wildflower: the Bluebonnet.

The image with the footpath, comes from Tandy Hills Natural Area in Fort Worth, Texas. Located just minutes from downtown, it preserverves over 160 acres of native prairie, and you can find some spectatcular sunsets here, especially during the blooming season. Milkweed in endless varieties is prevalent, and milkweed is the favorite food (as well as place to cocoon) for the Monarch Butterfly.