Named Emerging Artist for 2018 Main Street Fort Worth Arts Festival

I’m incredibly thrilled to announce that I have been named an emerging artist for this year’s Main Street Fort Worth Arts Festival, which will be held April 19-22, 2018 in Fort Worth, Texas.

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The Main Street Fort Worth Arts Festival  is one of the top three juried Fine Arts Festivals in the United States, which uses a five-member panel of art professionals to make their selections. They had 1282 artists apply from around the world. While 223 artists were invited to participate, their emerging artist category is specifically used to help spotlight new and emerging Texas artists. To be included in this group of 20 artists across a range of media including photography, painting, sculpture, and jewelry is a tremendous honor.  There’s only a very limited part of a career where an artist can be eligible for this category, and this was in all likelihood the only time I would ever by eligible for this wonderful opportunity that will have long-lasting repercussions for my career. To say that I’m ecstatic, is an understatement.

 

So please save the following dates: April 19-22, 2018 and come out and support all of the amazingly-talented artists specially selected to this year’s festival. I’ll look forward to you visiting me at Booth #351 (near the intersection of 3rd Street & Main Street).

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It’s Hip to Be Square

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This Saturday, January 13, 2018 from 7pm – 11pm, I will have work hanging in the show at the Central Arts of Bedford located at 2816 Central, Suite #126 in Bedford, Texas.

The show is free and open to the public, so please come out and support all the exhibiting local artists.

3rd Annual Conroe Art League National Invitational Show

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Wide Open Spaces – Taken July 2017 in Valentine, Texas (near Prada Marfa)

I’m pleased to announce that out of a multitude of submissions from across the United States, my work, Wide Open Spaces, will be part of the 3rd Annual Conroe Art League National Invitational Show featuring 100 artistic pieces from 95 artists as selected by Juror Peter Andrew, Professor of Art at Stephen F. Austin State University.

Mr. Andrew is a Fulbright Fellow and member of the New York Society of Illustrators. He is also a working artist with the Liquitex Acrylic’s Artist’s Outreach Program. As an accomplished figurative and abstract painter, his work has been featured in over fifty solo shows and two hundred group shows. His paintings have been exhibited at three Presidential Inaugural Galas in Washington, DC. His commissions have included such clients as Amegy Bank, Houston Methodist Hospital and Fort Belvoir US Army Hospital, Virginia. See more about Peter and his art at www.peterandrew.net.

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The 3rd Annual Conroe Art League National Invitational Show 

 

 

  • March 7-31, 2018
  • The Gallery at the Madeley Building
  • 127 Simonton Street in Conroe, Texas

 Artist Reception and Award Ceremony

  • on Saturday, March 24 from 5:00 – 8:00 pm

 

 

 

GAP Winter Wonderland Reception Friday

Join us in Grapevine this Friday, November 17th at 6:30pm for a free reception celebrating the Grapevine Art Project‘s Winter Wonderland Show inside the Lancaster Theater Lobby at the Palace Arts Center located at 300 S. Main Street. Many artists will be in attendance so it’s a great chance to see what your local arts community is up to, and talk to us about our art.

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If you can’t make it to the reception the show is currently open and will run through December 31st, and is available to view Monday through Friday from 9am – 5pm, as well as during other special events at the PAC.

For more information please visit the official website.

 

 

 

2017 IAA Photography Exhibition – Now Open with Reception this Sunday

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The 2017 IAA Photography Expedition has now opened, and will run through December 1st at the Jaycee Parks Center for the Arts in Irving, Texas. The show is free and open to the public. I feel honored that one of my pieces (Turn Back Time) was selected to participate in this photography competition juried by Mark Thompson. The exhibition contains 75 pieces in total from 44 different regional photographers.

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AWARDS CEREMONY & RECEPTION

  • Sunday, November 5th
  • From 2 – 4 pm
  • At the Jaycee Parks Center for the Arts
  • 1975 Puritan Drive in Irving, Texas

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I hope you will join all of us during the Reception and Awards Ceremony for the 2017 Irving Art Association’s Photography Exhibition featuring many talented regional photographers, including not only myself but fellow Grapevine Art Project member Klaus Mayer. The preview gallery for all the selected works can be viewed on the IAA’s official website here.

 

 

GAP’s Winter Wonderland Art Show

I’ve got 4 different outlets this month where my photography is on exhibit. One of them now open to the public is at the historic Palace Arts Center in Grapevine where my photograph I took of Beacon Falls in the Hudson River Valley in New York entitled Bridge Over Troubled Waters is on display. It is but one work among many of the other talented works by members from the Grapevine Art Project. The show is free and open to the public.

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GAP WINTER WONDERLAND

The show runs from November 1st – December 31st, at the Palace Arts Center located at 301 S. Main Street in Grapevine, Texas and is available to view Monday through Friday from 9am – 5pm, as well as during other special events at the PAC.

 

 

For more information about the historic Palace Arts Center please visit  here.

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Pushing Daisies – Art Show October 28th

There will be a reception on Saturday, October 28th from 7-11pm for the latest themed show–Pushing Daisies–at the Central Arts of Bedford located at 2816 Central Drive in Bedford. I’ll have several pieces hanging in the show, and of course a range of my prints are also available for perusal.

Admission is free, costumes are encouraged, so please come on by to support your local artists!

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The Fort Davis Area of Texas

Fort Davis is a very small town with a population of 1200 (2010 Census), and has the highest elevation in the entire state for any Texas county-seat at 5,050 feet above sea level. It’s really known for

  1. The National Fort Davis Historic Site, which preserves the best remaining examples of old US ARMY Forts from the Southwestern United States. Fort Davis was established in 1854.
  2. McDonald Observatory, while key scientific discoveries and research occurs at the site, this observatory is one of the few in the world that invites the public to special programs like their Sky Parties.
  3. Davis Mountains State Park
  4. Chihuahuan Desert Nature Center & Botanical Garden

 

While the Dallas / Fort Worth area was skirting with temperatures just shy of 100 degrees Fahrenheit, I escaped in the middle of July to the Davis Mountains in the Southwestern corner of the state of Texas, highs were in the low 80s, and overnights low were briskly cold. The Davis Mountains not only offers some of the most picturesque vistas throughout the entire state of Texas, the cooler temperatures had the land lushly green, which wasn’t something I was expecting to see.

 

The state park has two bird blinds, which are great for bird watchers, photographers, and the curious. This is where I nabbed this great shot of a Pine Siskin. Plus you can get a special pass for access to the park after dark to make use of the scenic overlook to enjoy some Dark Skies for some star gazing without camping over night there. In my case, rain storms came in during the night and rained out my plans for some night photography, but it’s a great resource I plan to use when I next make a try at night photography. The State Park is within line of sight of McDonald Observatory, if you look very carefully at the vista on the top right and bottom right, the tiny white dots on the top of that mountain in the difference is the Observatory.

In less than 15 minutes you leave the Davis Mountains State Park behind and can find yourself on the fringes of the Chihuahuan Desert, and a Nature Center that showcases the flora and fauna of the region’s desert. This is an important corridor for hummingbird migration, and scientists do tag the birds in their attempts to learn more about them.

 

 

 

Marfa, Texas – One “Giant” Movie, & The Arts

As mentioned previously, Marfa’s claim to fame:

  1. the movie Giant was filmed here
  2. it’s a well-known Arts destination

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Giant (1956) was directed by Hollywood artistic juggernaut George Stevens (who won an Academy Award for Best Director for his work on the film), and earned a total of 9 Academy Nominations for work both behind and in front of the screen. Starring Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson, and James Dean in his last role (and only third film) before his untimely death. Even though the film came out in the 1956, there continues to be a dialogue about this cinemas Classic. There’s been at least two different documentaries: Return To Giant (2003), and Children of Giant (2015). Giant has withstood the test of time, because it dared to be about matters of substance. The film was ahead of its time as it spotlighted racial prejudice and segregation against latinos. One only needs to turn the news on to see how these are still relevant issues today as the nation is indulged in conversations about Mexican Immigrants and DACA.

One of the go to tourists destinations is the restored Hotel Paisano. The Hotel was designed by famed architect Henry Trost in the 1920s. In the 1950s Hollywood came to the Hotel, when the movie Giant was in production. Many of the cast and crew stayed at the hotel, or made use of its amenities. Today there’s some film memorabilia up around the hotel, and there’s a number of small shops (including one that sells Giant film related merchandise), and a gallery attached to the hotel too.

 

Despite being a town of around 2000 residents, Marfa boasts well over a dozen art galleries, the most preeminent Art destination being the Chinati Foundation. While Marfa may feature numerous art galleries plus a number of retail shops specializing in artisan wares. Many of them have limited hours primarily focused to Friday – Sunday. I knew this going to the town, but even so I found half the places I tried to visit closed the Saturday I went. Between vacations, and galleries between installations my luck was not with me.

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Still I managed to make it to Book Marfa, which features a specially curated book store, artisan made goods, as well as a mini art gallery with works for sale. I love their regional book section. Anyone with an interest in ancient art especially of ancient man the book the White Shaman Mural is a must read.

The White Shaman Mural: An Enduring Creation Narrative in the Rock Art of the Lower Pecos by Carolyn E. Boyd, Kim Cox

Winner, Society for American Archarology Book Award, 2017

The prehistoric hunter-gatherers of the Lower Pecos Canyonlands of Texas and Coahuila, Mexico, created some of the most spectacularly complex, colorful, extensive, and enduring rock art of the ancient world. Perhaps the greatest of these masterpieces is the White Shaman mural, an intricate painting that spans some twenty-six feet in length and thirteen feet in height on the wall of a shallow cave overlooking the Pecos River. In The White Shaman Mural, Carolyn E. Boyd takes us on a journey of discovery as she builds a convincing case that the mural tells a story of the birth of the sun and the beginning of time—making it possibly the oldest pictorial creation narrative in North America.

Unlike previous scholars who have viewed Pecos rock art as random and indecipherable, Boyd demonstrates that the White Shaman mural was intentionally composed as a visual narrative, using a graphic vocabulary of images to communicate multiple levels of meaning and function. Drawing on twenty-five years of archaeological research and analysis, as well as insights from ethnohistory and art history, Boyd identifies patterns in the imagery that equate, in stunning detail, to the mythologies of Uto-Aztecan-speaking peoples, including the ancient Aztec and the present-day Huichol. This paradigm-shifting identification of core Mesoamerican beliefs in the Pecos rock art reveals that a shared ideological universe was already firmly established among foragers living in the Lower Pecos region as long as four thousand years ago.

I swung by the famous Ballroom Marfa for their installation at the time, and was rather taken by this artists use of electrical current through tobacco to the cooper sheet metal. I think in this case, it brings back fond memories of me working with copper during my metal & jewelry days. There was also an interesting exhibit that tackled political issues of identity as found in language and how various countries were using accents to authentic paperwork and grant or deny admittance to their country for foreigners. I also tried to visit the artisan retail fronts of both Freda,and the Wrong Store but they were also closed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Call me a Monarchist! I just adore this butterfly.

As a long time resident of the Dallas / Fort Worth area I’ve long been aware of a pair of fluttering orange and black wings that are seen during two key times throughout the year: Spring and Fall. The Monarch Butterfly winters in Mexico, but when temperatures rise in the Spring they begin their northern journey into the United States and the Southern most portions of Canada.

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Source: http://www.monarchwatch.org

In Autumn, the butterflies migrate south so they can spend the winter in Mexico.

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Source: http://www.monarchwatch.org

Their Winter nest is so laden with butterflies, it’s as if the trees in lieu of leaves have butterflies instead. Truly it’s a marvel. Scientists estimate that 6 out of every 10 butterflies die from starvation en route due to the loss of native habitat and native wildflowers that produce sustaining nectar. Here’s a short video on how you can help to preserve this annual wonder, plus some amazing photos of the Mexican winter home. Watch it on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kuMASSrli9A

There’s even a research site trying to tag and track them to more thoroughly map their migration patterns and routes over at MonarchWatch.org. Thanks to them you can get an idea of their Spring and Fall migration maps as seen above.